Category Archives: sports arbitrage

sports arbitrage

‘Arbitrage’ should put Richard Gere back on the movie star map

With a sale pending, his associate demands his money back, against Miller’s protests. No matter which road he takes, Miller is on his way to a very bad place. Miller is then caught in a series of escalating nightmares, from an affair gone wrong to the looming merger deadline to becoming the target in a police investigation.

“Arbitrage” is a resurrection of sorts for Gere. Bryer’s (Tim Roth) scrutiny while working the legal system to get his patsy (Nate Parker) off an accomplice charge. That’s both a testament to Gere’s performance as much as Jarecki’s screenplay.

. He keeps up the façade of a sparkling billionaire, but behind those eyes we see raw fear and a conscience devouring itself.

Gere is wonderfully contrasted by the gutsy and grimy performance by Tim Roth as Detective Bryer. She expertly turns a seemingly non-existent role from the first half of the film into a heavy-hitting, blood-boiling performance by film’s end.

Director Nicholas Jarecki’s first feature shows that he is a master juggler, keeping many equally intriguing threads of the story in the air without ever letting them fall. When things are going strong for Miller, Gere gives us a raucous, pompous performance of a man deifying himself. Gere really shines, though, as Miller comes close to losing everything.

Richard Gere cooks the books in “Arbitrage,” an elegantly crafted potboiler that fires on all cylinders, giving the “Officer and a Gentlemen” star his juiciest role yet.

“Arbitrage” opens in theaters and is also available on-demand on September 14.

Gere is superb at portraying the sliding scale of success. Roth is coarse as he cuts through all the seedy economic and legal details, desperately trying to stick evidence to the sly and slithering Miller. He is a perfect fit for Robert Miller, just as “Arbitrage” is a perfect fit for the star.

Jarecki fashions a wonderful Shakespearean character with Miller. Susan Sarandon gives a noteworthy performance as Miller’s wife. Though he is a pretty rotten person and quite conscious his actions are destroying everyone around him, it’s hard to not have a modicum of empathy for Miller. Jarecki gives us a fascinating look into the mind of a financially and morally bankrupt individual.

Gere delivers his best performance to date as Robert Miller, a hedge fund magnate secretly on the brink of bankruptcy. On top of all that, Miller must hide his fraudulent business dealings from his heir-apparent daughter Brooke (Brit Marling) and try to negotiate his buyer into purchasing his failed company. In a shady move to make his company look profitable and enticing to potential buyers, Miller borrows half a billion dollars from an associate (played by director William Friedkin) to temporarily store in his accounts. We witness him consciously make terrible choice after terrible choice, like a tragic hero. Miller’s scheme is mere inches from success when he accidentally kills his mistress (Laetitia Casta) in a car accident, bringing forth questions from the police and his wife (Susan Sarandon).  He works hard to avoid NYPD Det

The Ups and Downs of Arbitrage Betting and Trading

And two months later I began sports trading, leaving my arbitrage betting days behind.

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But let’s just start from the advantages of arbitrage betting.

In my case the guaranteed profit was even better than that!

A DRAW?

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You must be quick to find arbitrage bets.

You must be super quick to find arbitrage bets. Thus, I think new arbitrageurs can be profitable even today.

By the time arbitrageurs have placed their bets, their profit is guaranteed. This funding will probably max out your credit card(s).

Constant money moving. What’s that at Betfair? A third possible outcome you say?

If you are going to give arbitrage a shot after all, be very careful and begin betting or trading small. No need to wait for the final whistle.

There is zero chance that arbitrageurs will lose money from the particular game. A lesson that made me withdraw all of my funds from all the bookmakers, except Betfair. I could let the specific bets as is and make a profit, unless the games ends a draw. Some still make a lot of money. Moving money around does not only mean extra commissions with banks, but may also arise suspicions.

And last but not least, you can still lose big chunks of money if you don’t pay close attention when placing your arbitrage bets.

I spent the following 5 minutes deciding how to react. Yes, so quick that I had to write it twice for emphasis!

While there are services, which let you know when there is an arbitrage opportunity, they come at a cost. Much like arbitrage bettors are looking at sports events, arbitrage traders do the same when trading stocks, forex, bonds, commodities, derivatives and other financial instruments, looking at the markets worldwide.

Oh, wait. At one point, an account of yours will be full of money, while the rest will be depleted. As a result, they may limit the stakes they are accepting from you or even forbid you to continue betting with them. That is because they have bet on every possible outcome of the game.

Given the infinite number of sports events around the globe, new opportunities for arbitrage betting will constantly arise, especially as more and more people are introduced to betting or gambling in general.

Don’t dig into arbitrage betting before reading of the disadvantages

Two golfers were competing at a golf course, when I noticed the divergence of the betting odds between Betfair and another online bookmaker. What a relief! My bets were both accepted and I just had to wait for the game’s result before I got paid. And no, the game did not end a draw but it still was a great lesson for me. Noticed the word “almost”? That is because you still stand to lose some money. Worst case scenario? To confiscate your money. Because I was going to get paid for sure, I had just bet on both golfers.

These advantages apply as well to arbitrage trading. Lessons can come cheap. The reason I am talking today about arbitrage, is an email I received from a visitor of my gambling blog. You can’t expect the results to even out among the bookmakers. And that is not the worst thing it can happen in arbitrage.. Arbitrage trading is likewise an almost risk-free way of trading any kind of financial instrument. Yes, that’s happened before.

An arbitrageur has to open accounts with several betting or trading companies. I also write about my success or failure and run a small business.

Of course, my bets now resulted to a loss, no matter the final outcome of the golf game. Because that is when I was going to lose a hefty amount of my total bankroll! As I am not used to gamble with my money (I know, it sounds peculiar, but by the time gambling becomes an investing, you stop gambling with your money), I reluctantly gave away some of my future profits to cover the losses of a likely draw.

Let me tell you my short story about when I finally decided to quit arbitrage betting.

As quickly as possible, I had my Excel spreadsheet calculate the stakes and I submitted my bets concurrently at the two betting operators. And I have heard that by the time you get to hear of that, it’s already too late.

Many bookmakers do not welcome bettors, who follow an arbitrage betting pattern. Keep your capital safe for when you are more experienced.

People have made a lot of money in arbitrage. Their sole worry is just how much money they can make but they neglect the fact that they can also lose money, even in this advertised as risk-free investment.

I respect your privacy

Arbitrage betting is an almost risk-free way of betting on sports. Usually the ROI of a sure bet is about 1 to 2%, although you may stand lucky occasionally and find a 4 or 5% gold mine!

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People usually focus on the bright side of any investment, like in arbitrage betting or trading. That was my first (and last) bet on a golf game.

I myself haven’t spent more than a month taking advantage of fluctuating odds and prices when trying out arbitrage. Here is why:

And that is when the emotion of relief converts into panic in a matter of nanoseconds!

WRITTEN BY

Jim Makos

By advantage gambling and investing with real money online, I put my money where my mouth is. Yet, my little experience has taught be enough to recommend anyone against arbitrage betting or trading. They are considering a career in arbitrage trading in particular.

As I was getting really tired the past few weeks, surfing around looking for sure bets as they are commonly known, I had found a really generous one at a golf event. These accounts also need sufficient funding. That was almost 10 years ago! So, yes, I am far from the arbitrage expert you were expecting to be talking here

Review: Richard Gere too good to ignore in ‘Arbitrage’

As the son of two commodities traders, Jarecki has Wall Street in his DNA. At 62, he is at the peak of his powers. That’s when NYPD detective Michael Bryer (Tim Roth) smells a rat and Robert’s world begins to unravel.

There’s enough plot here to stuff a miniseries or three, yet “Arbitrage” never descends to bland and predictable. But Gere gives us a window into the soul of a man who finally realizes that even money will no longer help him lie to himself. Credit Jarecki, whose combustible directing debut gives “Arbitrage” the charge of a thriller and the provocation of a moral fable. Docs run in the Jarecki family, with half brothers Andrew (“Capturing the Friedmans”) and Eugene (“Why We Fight”) making notable contributions to the genre. She can’t rock his composure. Fraud puts pressure on Robert’s skill at deceiving wife Ellen (Susan Sarandon), French mistress Julie (Laetitia Casta) and chief accountant Brooke (Brit Marling), who also happens to be his daughter. Watch him in the scene when Sarandon — in full, feisty flower — hits Robert with a lifetime of resentments. And Gere knows the man, inside and out. And it resonates in his exceptional screenplay, which potently captures the gleaming seduction of Robert’s world and the fear that festers underneath.

Gere’s performance in “Arbitrage” is too good to ignore. But Robert keeps his cool until the sudden death of one of these women has him dodging a possible murder rap with the grudging help of Jimmy Grant (a terrific Nate Parker), the son of the family chauffeur and the only black man in Robert’s circle of white privilege. No Academy love, not even for his sinister brilliance in “Internal Affairs,” “American Gigolo” and “The Hoax,” or for the battered heart he brought to the cheated-on husband in “Unfaithful.”

“Arbitrage” is such a movie, a sinfully entertaining look at the sins committed in the name of money. Jarecki has an eye for the telling detail, not surprising given his start with the 2005 documentary “The Outsider” (about rogue director James Toback). And the glamour in his field of vision — cheers to cinematographer Yorick Le Saux (I Am Love) for the sheen and composer Cliff Martinez (Drive) for the seductive mood — is tempting enough to make us all complicit.. Wearing the trappings of wealth like a second skin, Gere invites us to see what Robert sees. True, this territory has been covered from Wall Street to last year’s “Margin Call.” But Gere and first-time director Nicholas Jarecki put a tantalizing spin on what goes on in the head of a fraudulent hedge-fund manager when he decides to stick it to the rest of us, including his own family.

Jarecki knows the territory. For proof that we’re in financial hell, look around. Gere’s Robert Miller is the picture of unflappable elegance. It’s an implosive tour de force.

Story highlightsRichard Gere stars as a fraudulent financier in the filmCritic says Gere’s performance is “a thing of toxic beauty”The movie also stars Susan Sarandon and Laetitia Casta

It’s instructive to note what a killer actor Richard Gere can be when a movie rises to his level.

Like the best movies, “Arbitrage” persuades us to ask tough questions about ourselves. Despite his box-office success in crowd-pleasers such as “An Officer and a Gentleman,” “Pretty Woman” and “Chicago,” Gere has long been underrated. His rapt, watchful performance is a thing of toxic beauty. Gere digs so deep into this flawed tycoon that we come to understand Robert’s actions without for a minute forgiving them. Good job on that, since he’s just lost $400 million in a bad copper-mine investment, and if he can’t cover it up and unload his company on a major bank, his career will go kaput along with his fortune. And Gere nails every nuance in a role that holds up a dark mirror to the way we live now